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Alysse Weinberg, Jérémie Séror and Marc Gobeil had the pleasure to present at t the Integrated Content and Language in Higher Education Conference: ICLHE 2015: At the Crossroads Between Innovation and Practice in Brussels in September 2015.  Her talk was entitled: Cooperation and tension between language and discipline professors in a Canadian tertiary French Immersion . The presentation focused on the impact of language ideologies found in the administrative actions and pedagogic interventions associated to the French Immersion Studies (FIS) program. The study focused on two objectives. First, identifying the language ideologies found in the discourse of language instructors participating in the FIS program. Second, investigating how these ideologies affected the relationship and interactions which occurred between language and discipline professors in the FIS. 

Hélène Knoerr had the pleasure to present at the Integrated Content and Language in Higher Education Conference: ICLHE 2015: At the Crossroads Between Innovation and Practice in Brussels in September 2015.  Her talk was entitled Investigating the Ideologies of Content Professors in an Adjunct Immersion Model. The FIS program uses the adjunct model, in which students take a discipline course in their second language along with native speakers, and also take a language support class designed around the discipline course. This model requires awareness, support and cooperation on the part of the content professors who, unlike the language professors, are not necessarily familiar with and supportive of the approach and its implications (Knoerr, 2010).She interviewed six content instructors involved in the FIS program on their beliefs and ideas about language, teaching and learning based on their past life experiences as well as current teaching experience within the French Immersion Studies (FIS) program of the University of Ottawa. She then analyzed how these beliefs affected their roles as content professors teaching FIS students. The finding showed that the interviewed professors shared the following characteristics: They were specialists in their own academic field as well as in university pedagogy. They had a history of mobility in their academic careers and life and were fluent in two or more languages. They had a good understanding of the issues faced by linguistic minorities and were predisposed to be sympathetic to their situation. These professors had a profound respect and admiration for the FIS immersion students and would think over and change their teaching practices and beliefs to better accommodate them.

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