OLBI Research Forum

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May 3, 2019 - Théâtre et FLS : l’art de l’interaction

The aim of the Forum is to provide a platform for an exchange between the University of Ottawa's researchers and the guest international and national speakers in the domains of second language teaching and language policy.

Admission is free. Students are welcome.

The forum is open to all, but registration is required by email at ilobdir@uOttawa.ca.

Presentations are live streamed on Facebook: @ILOBOLBI

Théâtre et FLS : l’art de l’interaction

Date: Mai 3, 2019

Time: 1 pm - 2:30 pm

Location: 60 University, Simard Hall, Room 125

Language: French

Abstract:

La perspective actionnelle de l’enseignement du FLS identifie l’apprenant comme un acteur social qui cherche à interagir avec des locuteurs de la langue cible dans des contextes de vie réelle. Ainsi, les objectifs linguistiques sont intimement liés à des objectifs paralinguistiques d’ordre fonctionnel, culturel et inter-relationnel au service d’un vivre ensemble.
Le théâtre est quant à lui un art de la parole en action qui offre de nombreuses pistes d’apprentissage de la langue, de la culture et de l’expression artistique elle même.

Au cours de ce forum-atelier, nous examinerons ensemble comment l’enseignement du FLS peut s’harmoniser aux techniques théâtrales. Nous explorerons l’apport de l’expérience théâtrale en FLS selon trois approches: le théâtre (lu, joué, regardé), l’art dramatique (drama) et le théâtre de l’opprimé de Augusto Boal (théâtre invisible, théâtre forum).

Past events

2018-2019 Schedule

Théâtre et FLS : l’art de l’interaction

Date: Mai 3, 2019

Time: 1 pm - 2:30 pm

Location: 60 University, Simard Hall, Room 125

Language: French

Abstract:

La perspective actionnelle de l’enseignement du FLS identifie l’apprenant comme un acteur social qui cherche à interagir avec des locuteurs de la langue cible dans des contextes de vie réelle. Ainsi, les objectifs linguistiques sont intimement liés à des objectifs paralinguistiques d’ordre fonctionnel, culturel et inter-relationnel au service d’un vivre ensemble.
Le théâtre est quant à lui un art de la parole en action qui offre de nombreuses pistes d’apprentissage de la langue, de la culture et de l’expression artistique elle même.

Au cours de ce forum-atelier, nous examinerons ensemble comment l’enseignement du FLS peut s’harmoniser aux techniques théâtrales. Nous explorerons l’apport de l’expérience théâtrale en FLS selon trois approches: le théâtre (lu, joué, regardé), l’art dramatique (drama) et le théâtre de l’opprimé de Augusto Boal (théâtre invisible, théâtre forum).

Source use in academic writing: Challenges for students and assessors

Date: April 16, 2019

Time: 12:30 pm – 2 pm

Location: 70 Laurier Avenue, E., Hamelin Hall, Room 509

Language: English

Abstract:

Integrating information from outside sources is a key requirement for academic writing in many disciplines, and for this reason we have seen a rise in the use of integrated writing tasks, which require test takers to refer to at least one written or aural outside source in the production of their own texts. Such test tasks require students to understand the source text, analyze the assigned writing topic, select appropriate information from the source text, and organize source ideas and their own opinions into a cohesive text. These task requirements pose significant challenges for second language (L2) writers, and previous research has shown that L2 writers are more likely than first language (L1) writers to use source information inappropriately by not citing sources or relying too much on the language of the source text. In this talk, I will share findings from a research project designed to explore the specific challenges students faced in an EAP program in order to develop specific pedagogical materials to help address those challenges. In Phase 1 of the project, we collected students’ source-based essay exams and analyzed the following aspects in these essays: (1) language used to refer to source information, (2) accuracy of source information presented in the essay, and (3) purpose for the inclusion of source information. We also interviewed EAP students and their instructors to get a better understanding of their perception of students’ challenges in integrating source information appropriately. In Phase 2 of the project, we examined the effectiveness of the pedagogical materials we designed to address the challenges identified in Phase 1. From an instructor perspective, I will discuss the implications of the findings for EAP programs. From an assessor perspective, I will discuss the challenges that integrated writing tasks pose and how they might be addressed.

The Kurdish Language: From Linguicide to Standardization

Date: March 29, 2019

Time: 1 pm - 2:30 pm

Location: 70 Laurier Avenue, E., Hamelin Hall, Room 509

Language: English

Abstract:

In this talk, we will provide an overview of the history and development of Kurdish language varieties in four countries: Iran, Iraq, Syria and Turkey. Then, language policies of these nation-states, particularly with respect to Kurdish, will be critically evaluated. We will illustrate that although Kurdish speakers continue to demand positive language rights the nation-state ideology of one nation equals one language perpetuates assimilating language management practices throughout Kurdistan.
 

How to examine anxiety, perceived competence and willingness to communicate in real time and what doing so means

Date:January 25, 2019

Time:1 p.m. to 2:30 p.m.

Location:70 Laurier Ave. E.,Room 509 - Hamelin Building

Language:English

Abstract:

For the past decade, the complex dynamic systems theory (CDST) approach to describing second language learning has presented our field with one conundrum after another. On the one hand, a dynamic systems approach offers a compelling story of development, rooted in messy variability that seems true to the nature of learning as people experience it.On the other hand, there is a gap between the promise of CDST and its research products so far.Why? The difficulty lies not just in conceiving the world in dynamic terms is itself complex, but also that methodology to study dynamic systems in the second language arena is in need of further development. This presentation will review a series of problems and solutions to the methodological challenges presented by a dynamic approach.The focus will be on changing the view of how individual difference concepts, including language anxiety, perceived competence and willingness to communicate, work together in real time. This work is challenging not only the way research is done, but also the nature of the research questions allowed in the field. At the moment, however, thinking about dynamic systems in second language development is well ahead of rigorous, empirical descriptions of those systems. However, as this problem is being solved, new and informative insights in both teaching and research are emerging.

 

Peter D. MacIntyre

Peter D. MacIntyre

La formation continue des enseignants de langues aujourd’hui : enjeux, impacts et outils pour impliquer les enseignants

Date: December 2nd, 2018

Time:10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.

Location:Johnson Room in the Alex Trebek Hall

Language:French

Abstract:

Dans un domaine en constante évolution, entre MOOC, ateliers courts, échanges de pratiques, formations diplômantes ou autoformation, comment la formation continue peut-elle être envisagée? Comment envisager son développement professionnel en tant qu’enseignant ? En tant que responsable de centre comment accompagner et impliquer nos collègues dans leur parcours et assurer un enseignement de qualité ?

 

Christine Busson-Camara,

Christine Busson-Camara

Automated Corrective Feedback in the Context of ASR-supported Pronunciation Training: how effective can it be?

Date:October 19, 2018

Time:13:00– 14:30

Location:129 Louis Pasteur, RoomLPR 286

Language:Bilingual

Abstract:

Recently, Web 2.0 and mobile applications have become an endless source of new technological tools that integrate Automatic Speech Recognition (ASR). Their use in learning environments has led to a growing interest by researchers whose studies demonstrate the effectiveness of these new tools in relation to acquiring L2 pronunciation, to developing oral proficiency in general, and to providing instantaneous individualized feedback (Strik et al. 2009, 2012; Cucchiarini & Strik, 2013, Liakin et al. 2015, 2017).

In this presentation, we will first examine different types of implicit and explicit corrective feedback that ASR-based applications can provide and will discuss their impact on the acquisition of L2 pronunciation in light of SLA findings (Lyster 1998, 2004; Ellis et al., 2006; Lee & Lyster, 2016 among others). Second, we will report the results of our action research on the use of three different ASR-based tools in two university-level French pronunciation courses, with specific reference to learners’ perceptions of the utility of different types of automatic corrective feedback provided by these applications.To conclude, we will offer avenues of discussion and practical suggestions for the effective and sensible integration of ASR-based applications in the teaching and learning of L2 pronunciation, in and beyond the classroom.
 

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